10 Tips on how to keep your home cool this summer!

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In the summer, we all know how uncomfortable a hot home can be. With summer being right around the corner, it is a good idea to prepare your home for the heat. Continue reading for 10 ways to keep your home cool this summer.

Tips

  1. Switch to LED light bulbs. LED bulbs produce less heat and use up to 75% less energy than incandescent light bulbs, saving you money at the same time.
  2. Use ceiling, portable desk, and floor fans to circulate air, making your home feel cooler.
  3. Light bulbs give off heat when they’re being used. Add light dimmers and occupancy sensors so your light bulbs turn off when you’re not in the room.
  4. Block the sun’s heat from your home by installing solar screens, window tinting, or shutters.
  5. Buy an air conditioner ahead of time. If you buy a window AC unit, make sure to insulate around it.
  6. Plant trees and bushes outside your home to create shade.
  7. Reduce the use of appliances, and unplug the ones you are not using.
  8. Minimalize your kitchen use throughout the day. A helpful tip is to meal prep in the morning or night when temperatures are cooler.
  9. Wet your patio floor. Evaporation naturally cools the air.
  10. Weather strip doors and windows to keep outside heat from coming in, and keep your cool air from your AC from seeping out.
https://blog.constellation.com/2020/06/25/how-to-keep-your-house-cool-without-raising-your-energy-bill/

Helpful resources:

Home Cooling | Department of Energy

Heat Safety Tips and Resources (weather.gov)


Are you prepared for this summer’s heat?

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Summer is right around the corner which means sunshine and heat! While Pacific Northwesterners anxiously await these warmer months, we also need to be conscious of potential risks associated with extreme heat. For those who may be heat sensitive or who do not have adequate access to cooling systems or water, extreme temperatures can be life threatening. And with extreme heat events predicted to now be more common due to our changing climate, it is a good time to look at ways to prepare.

As you may recall, last summer we experienced a record-breaking heat wave that lasted 7 days—from June 26th to July 2nd. According to the Washington State Department of Health, there were 100 heat related deaths reported throughout the state. In Skagit County, we sadly lost 6 individuals to heat related complications during this time.

It is crucial that during these times we are ready and prepared. Being ready can help to prevent heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps and—most importantly—death. Do you know the signs of heat-related illnesses and ways to respond? Keep reading for some helpful information.

Prepare for Extreme Heat

  • Weather strip doors and windows.
  • Cover windows with drapes or shades.
  • Have at least 2 fans to create air flow in home. Remember fans create air flow and a false sense of comfort but will not reduce your body temperature or prevent heat-related illnesses.
  • Install a window air conditioner and insulate around it.
  • Add insulation to keep the heat out.
  • Know of cooling places like stores or libraries near you! Contact Skagit County Public Health to find a cooling shelter near you—(360) 416-1500.

Be Safe During

  • Stay hydrated and drink lots of fluids.
  • Take cold showers or baths.
  • Go to a cooling center if air conditioning is not available in your home.
  • Never leave people or pets in a closed vehicle on a hot or warm day.
  • Wear loose, light colored clothing, and lightweight clothes.
  • Use your oven less to help reduce heat in your home.
  • Avoid being outside.
  • Check in with family members to let them know you’re okay or to check if they’re okay. As well with neighbors, and friends.
  • Consider pet safety.
  • Watch for signs of heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

What is heat illness?

Some common heat illnesses are heat stroke, heat exhaustion, and heat cramps. Here are some signs to look out for.

Signs of Heat Stroke:

If you suspect a heat stroke, immediately call 9-1-1 or get the person to a hospital as soon as possible.

  • Rapid, strong pulse.
  • Red, hot, and dry skin with no sweat.
  • Dizziness, confusion, or unconsciousness.
  • Extremely high body temperature.

Signs Heat Cramps:

  • Muscle pains.
  • Spasms in the stomach, arms, or legs.

Signs of Heat Exhaustion:

  • Heavy sweating
  • Paleness
  • Muscle cramps
  • Tiredness
  • Weakness
  • Fast or weak pulse
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Fainting
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

If you have signs of heat cramps or heat exhaustion, go to the closest cooling center/location near you. Try to cool down by removing excess clothing and drink water or sports drinks. Call your healthcare provider if your symptoms get worse or last more than an hour.

Helpful Resources:

Extreme Heat | Ready.gov

Summer Safety (weather.gov)

Heat Wave 2021 | Washington State Department of Health


Don’t Fry Day: Sun Safety!

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Imagine yourself in ten years from now. How do you look? How’s your skin? What if you were told that you had skin cancer? Most of us do not think about how important our skin is and how crucial it is for us to take care of it every day.  

Although we have not had much sunshine this spring, the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention has designated the Friday before Memorial Day as “Don’t Fry Day” to share awareness and remind everyone to protect their skin while enjoying the outdoors as the summer gets closer.  

Keep reading for some tips on how you and your family can prevent skin cancer and long-term skin damage.  

Sun Safety Tips:  

  1. Do not burn or tan 
  • Avoid intentional tanning and tanning beds. 
  1. Seek Shade 
  • When it’s very hot out, sit under a tree or other shade structure. Use an umbrella when at the beach. 
  • Sun rays are the strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. 
  1. Wear protective clothing  
  • Use long sleeve shirts and pants 
  • Wide brimmed hat and sunglasses 
  1. Apply Sunscreen throughout your day 
  • Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with Sun Protection Factor (SPF) 30 or higher for protection from harmful ultraviolet A and B radiation.  
  • Budget friendly and clean sunscreens: CeraVe sunscreen, Neutrogena sunscreens, Derma e sunscreen, etc. To check if your sunscreen contains any harmful ingredients visit: Best Recreational Sunscreens | EWG’s Guide to Sunscreens 
  • Apply 15 minutes before going outside and reapply every two hours.  
  1. Use extra caution near water, snow, and sand 
  • These surfaces can be very harmful and reflect the damaging rays of the sun leaving you with a possible sunburn.  
  1. Get vitamin D safely 
  • Take vitamin supplements 
  • Incorporate in your healthy diet.  

What is Melanoma? 

Melanoma is a skin cancer that can spread to other parts of the body and causes over 9,000 deaths every year. People who die of melanoma lose an average of 20 years of life expectancy. Melanoma can be caused by too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays from sun or sources such as indoor tanning.  

Why Is it important? 

Skin Cancer is one of the most common diagnosed cancers in the United States. Too much sun exposure can age your skin, lead to skin cancer, weaken, or suppress your immune system.  

According to the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention, more than 1 million Americans are living with melanoma. Early detection of melanoma can save your life. Without additional prevention efforts, cases of melanoma will continue to increase in the next 15 years.  

You can detect it early by carefully examining all your skin once a month and visit your doctor if you notice a new or changing spot on your skin. For more helpful tips, visit How to Spot Skin Cancer

Please visit the sources for more information:  

Don’t Fry Day : National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention 

Healthy Skin  |  American Skin Association 

Best Recreational Sunscreens | EWG’s Guide to Sunscreens 

How to Spot Skin Cancer 

Preventing Melanoma | VitalSigns | CDC 


Firework Safety this Fourth of July

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Fire Officials Urge Extreme Caution on Firework Use

Recent extreme temperatures and dry weather has caused our state to be more vulnerable to wildfires in advance of this Fourth of July weekend. Following days of record-breaking heat across Washington, the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has asked Washingtonians to do whatever they can to help prevent wildfires.

“Due to our current temperatures and extreme dry conditions, the county is experiencing unprecedented high fire risk at this time. We are encouraging everyone to refrain from discharging consumer grade fireworks this season and attend commercial public displays instead. As a reminder, while it may be legal to discharge certain fireworks, you may still be liable for damage caused as a result. We need to have everyone do their part to avoid potential loss of life or risk property damage.”

Bonnie LaCount, Skagit County Deputy Fire Marshall

In Skagit County, a burn ban is currently in effect due to the recent extreme temperatures and dry weather conditions; however, there are no fireworks restrictions in unincorporated Skagit County between June 28 and July 5th. Even still, and though temperatures have cooled, our grasses, brush, and shrubs continue to have very low moisture content. Such dry conditions pose a serious wildfire risk for Skagit County and the surrounding region.

Fireworks are a common cause of large-scale fires, including the 2017 Eagle Creek Fire in Oregon. The fire was started by a teen igniting a firework and ultimately burned 50,000 acres. The teen was ultimately criminally sentenced and order to pay millions of dollars in restitution.

If residents do choose to use backyard fireworks, please keep wildfire safety and prevention at the forefront.

Below are some tips for using fireworks safely in dry weather:

  • Do not use fireworks on or near dry vegetation or combustible materials.
  • Be cautious when lighting fireworks when conditions are windy. The wind could blow a burning spark and set a nearby area on fire.
  • When using fireworks, always have a fire extinguisher, water supply, hose, or bucket of water nearby in case of a fire. Before discarding devices, be sure to douse them thoroughly with water.
  • Store fireworks in a cool, dry area to prevent an accidental ignition.
  • Supervise children closely when using fireworks. Sparklers are a popular firework given to children, and they burn at an extremely high temperature and can cause major injuries. For more tips on fireworks safety and children, visit: https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/fireworks.html
  • Never light more than one firework at a time, and never attempt to re-light one that did not ignite completely.
  • If a firework device ignites a fire, contact the local fire department or 911 immediately. Do not attempt to extinguish a large fire.

Fireworks are not the only concern this weekend for local and state fire officials. Under dry conditions, summer activities such as grilling also have the potential to cause large fires. Under Skagit’s current burn ban, it is asked that residents refrain from setting outdoor fires until further notice. Recreational and cooking fires—limited to 3 feet in diameter and two feet high—remain allowed within enclosures and when safety precautions are followed. Officials ask that residents douse recreational fires with water, stir it, and douse the fire again until it’s cool to the touch before leaving.

Please note: Skagit County regulates fireworks within the unincorporated portions of the county, i.e., outside the boundaries of the cities and towns. In unincorporated Skagit County, only fireworks allowed by state law are allowed. Fireworks are illegal on state forestlands and in most parks.

In unincorporated Skagit County, it is illegal to discharge fireworks except during the following dates and times:

HolidayDateSales Legal BetweenDischarge Legal Between
Fourth of JulyJune 2812 p.m. –11 p.m.12 p.m. –11 p.m.
 June 29 – July 39 a.m.–11 p.m.9 a.m.–11 p.m.
 July 49 a.m.– 11 p.m.9 a.m.–Midnight
 July 59 a.m.–9 p.m.9 a.m.–11 p.m.

For a list of public fireworks displays here in Skagit County, go to the County Fire Marshall webpage.

For questions about fireworks and/or open burning in Skagit County, please contact the Skagit County Fire Marshal’s Office at 360-416-1840, or go to the website at www.skagitcounty.net/firemarshal.