Returning Home After A Flood

Reading Time: 5 minutes

When returning to a home that’s been flooded after a natural disaster, be aware that your house may be contaminated by floodwaters, mold, or sewage, all of which can cause health risks for your family. Below are some tips for Skagitonians who may be returning home after flooding.

When you first reenter your home.

Before returning home, make sure that it is safe to do so. Always pay attention to authorities for information and instructions. 

When it is safe, try to return to your home during the daytime so that you do not have to use any lights. Use battery-powered flashlights and lanterns, rather than candles or gas lanterns. Please keep the following in mind:

  • If you have standing water in your home and can turn off the main power from a dry location, then go ahead and turn off the power, even if it delays cleaning. If you must enter standing water to access the main power switch, then call an electrician to turn it off. NEVER turn power on or off yourself or use an electric tool or appliance while standing in water.
  • If you smell gas or suspect a leak, turn off the main gas valve, open all windows, and leave your house immediately. Notify the gas company or the police or fire departments or State Fire Marshal’s office, and do not turn on the lights or do anything that could cause a spark. Do not return until you are told it is safe to do so.
  • If the house has been closed for several days, enter briefly to open doors and windows to let the house air out for a while (at least 30 minutes) before you stay for any length of time.
  • If your home has been flooded and has been closed for several days, assume your home has been contaminated by floodwater, sewage, and/or mold. See Floodwater After a Disaster or Emergency.

Stay out of floodwater.

Floodwaters contain many things that may harm health. It is important to protect yourself from exposure to floodwater regardless of the source of contamination. The best way to protect yourself is to stay out of the water.

If you come in contact with floodwater:

  • Wash with soap and clean water as soon as possible. If you don’t have soap or water, use alcohol-based wipes or sanitizer.
  • Take care of wounds and seek medical attention if necessary.
  • Wash clothes contaminated with flood or sewage water in hot water and detergent before reusing them.

If you must enter floodwater, wear rubber boots, rubber gloves, and goggles.

Throw away unsafe food.

Throw away food that may have come in contact with flood or storm water; perishable foods that have not been refrigerated properly due to power outages; and those with an unusual odor, color, or texture. Unsafe food can make you sick even if it looks, smells, and tastes normal. When in doubt, throw it out. For more information, visit Keep Food Safe After a Disaster or Emergency.

Use safe water.

Floodwater can contaminate your drinking water. Some contaminants from surface water get into the groundwater and affect private drinking water wells and municipal water systems that use groundwater.

Do not use water you suspect or have been told is contaminated to wash dishes, brush your teeth, wash and prepare food, wash your hands, make ice, or make baby formula. Safe water for drinking, cooking, and personal hygiene includes bottled, boiled, or treated water.

For tips on how to properly disinfect contaminated water, go to Public Health’s Safe Water webpage or give us a call at (360) 416-1500.

For well water:

Wells that have been flooded may be contaminated with pathogenic organisms that can cause disease (bacteria, viruses). To have well water tested, contact one of the labs below:

  • Edge Analytical, Burlington: 360-757-1400
  • Everett Environmental Laboratory, Everett: 425-257-8230
  • Monroe Water Quality Laboratory, Monroe: 360-794-6558
  • Exact Scientific Services, Ferndale: 360-733-1205
  • Lynden Water Treatment Plant, Lynden: 360-255-5470

For septic systems.

For information about what to do with your septic system after a flooding event, go to: https://www.epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water/septic-systems-what-do-after-flood.

Clean up your home safely.

Before you begin to clean, be sure to check in with your insurance company. You may need to document any damage to your property.

Take steps to protect yourself and your loved ones during the cleanup process. For more information, visit Clean Up Safely After a Disaster. Some quick tips?

  • Using personal protective equipment (or “PPE”), like gloves, eye protection, and a dust mask to avoid breathing in fine silts and sands.
  • Be sure to wear long sleeve shirts and pants while cleaning and wash hands frequently with soap and water.

Use generators and other electrical equipment safely.

Talk to your utility company about using electrical equipment, including power generators. Be aware that it is against the law and a violation of electrical codes to connect generators to your home’s electrical circuits without the approved, automatic-interrupt devices. If a generator is online when electrical service is restored, it can become a major fire hazard. In addition, the improper connection of a generator to your home’s electrical circuits may endanger line workers helping to restore power in your area.

All electrical equipment and appliances must be completely dry before returning them to service. Have a certified electrician check these items if there is any question. For more information, see Protect Yourself and Others From Electrical Hazards After a Disaster.

Never use a generator, pressure washer, any gasoline-powered engine, or charcoal grills inside your home, basement, or garage or less than 20 feet from any window, door, or vent. Visit Preventing Carbon Monoxide Poisoning After an Emergency for more information.

Dry out your home to prevent mold.

If flood or storm water has entered your home, dry it out as soon as possible to prevent mold. Here’s some helpful guidance:

People with asthma and other lung conditions and/or immune suppression should not enter buildings with indoor water leaks or mold growth that can be seen or smelled. Children should not take part in disaster cleanup work.

If you have electricity and an electrician has determined that it’s safe to turn it on, use a “wet-dry” shop vacuum (or the vacuum function of a carpet steam cleaner), an electric-powered water transfer pump, or sump pump to remove standing water. If you are operating equipment in wet areas, be sure to wear rubber boots to avoid electrocution.

If you do not have electricity, or it is not safe to turn it on, you can use a portable generator to power equipment to remove standing water. Note: If you must use a gasoline-powered pump, generator, pressure washer, or any other gasoline-powered tools to clean your home, never operate the gasoline engine inside a home, basement, garage, carport, porch, or other enclosed or partially enclosed structures, or less than 20 feet from any door, window, or vent, even if the windows and doors are open. Such improper use can create dangerously high levels of carbon monoxide and cause carbon monoxide poisoning.

If weather permits, open windows and doors of the house to aid in the drying-out process.

Use fans and dehumidifiers to remove excess moisture. Fans should be placed at a window or door to blow the air outwards rather than inwards, so not to spread the mold.

Have your home heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system checked and cleaned by a maintenance or service professional who is experienced in mold cleanup before you turn it on. If the HVAC system was flooded with water, turning on the mold-contaminated HVAC will spread mold throughout the house. Professional cleaning will kill the mold and prevent later mold growth. When the service determines that your system is clean and if it is safe to do so, you can turn it on and use it to help remove excess moisture from your home.

Prevent water outdoors from reentering your home. For example, rainwater from gutters or the roof should drain away from the house; the ground around the house should slope away from the house to keep basements and crawl spaces dry.

Ensure that crawl spaces in basements have proper drainage to limit water seepage. Ventilate to allow the area to dry out.

For more information on mold cleanup, visit Homeowner’s and Renter’s Guide to Mold Cleanup After Disasters.


If you have questions or concerns about re-entering your home, please contact Skagit County Public Health at (360) 416-1500 or email EH@co.skagit.wa.us.


El Condado Lanza Portal de Asistencia de Alquiler para los Residentes de Skagit

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Los residentes del condado de Skagit ahora tienen una opción conveniente para obtener una aprobación previa para recibir ayuda con el alquiler y las facturas de servicios públicos. Esta semana, el condado y sus socios comunitarios lanzaron un nuevo portal en línea donde los inquilinos pueden completar una sencilla encuesta de elegibilidad y consiga un proveedor de asistencia para el alquiler o complete una aplicación para asistencia.

Para acceder al portal, vaya a: www.skagitcounty.net/renthelp.  

El Programa de Asistencia de Alquiler del Condado de Skagit proporciona asistencia financiera a los inquilinos del condado de Skagit que cumplen con los requisitos de ingresos, y sus propietarios, que tal vez están teniendo dificultades para pagar el alquiler y los servicios públicos debido a la pandemia de COVID-19.

El Programa de Asistencia de Alquiler del Condado de Skagit se ha hecho posible gracias a una subvención de $8.9 millones proporcionada por el Departamento de Comercio del Estado de Washington y financiado por el Programa de Asistencia de Renta del Tesoro (T-RAP). El programa está destinado a evitar los desalojos durante la crisis de salud de COVID-19 en pagando pagos atrasado y el alquiler y los servicios públicos actuales / futuros para las personas que necesitan ayuda.

“Sabemos que muchos residentes del Condado de Skagit han sido afectados por COVID-19, y algunos tienen problemas para mantenerse al día con el alquiler. Hay ayuda disponible, y tenemos la esperanza de que el nuevo portal en línea será más fácil para los residentes y propietarios para conectar con los proveedores de asistencia de alquiler.”

– George Kosovich, Analista de Salud Pública del Condado de Skagit

Los hogares deben cumplir con los cuatro de los siguientes criterios de selección para ser elegible para asistencia de alquiler:

  1. Alguien en el hogar ha estado desempleado durante al menos 90 días, o experimentó una reducción en sus ingresos, incurrió en costos significativos o experimentó dificultades financieras durante la pandemia de COVID-19
  2. Debe estar experimentando inestabilidad de la vivienda o riesgo de inestabilidad de la vivienda, lo que puede incluir tarifas de alquiler impagas o anticipación de la imposibilidad de pagar el alquiler futuro
  3. El ingreso familiar está en, o bajo de 80% del Ingreso Medio del Área
  4. El hogar está en el Condado de Skagit

Los residentes que completen la encuesta de elegibilidad en línea serán emparejados con uno de los siguientes proveedores de asistencia para el alquiler:

  • FORWARD Aplicaciones En Línea – Sirviendo a los residentes del Condado de Skagit
  • La Autoridad de Vivienda del Condado de Skagit – Sirviendo a los Titulares de Vales de la Sección 8 e inquilinos de propiedades propiedad de la Autoridad de Vivienda
  • Centro de Trabajadores Agrícolas CCS – Sirviendo a miembros de la comunidad indígena, latina y campesina
  • Voluntarios de América Oeste de Washington – Sirviendo a los residentes del Condado de Skagit
  • Northwest Youth Services – Sirviendo a adultos jóvenes de 18 a 24 años
  • Community Action of Skagit County – Sirviendo a todos los residentes del Condado de Skagit

También, hay tres organizaciones que ofrecerán alcance y asistencia adicional para completar la solicitud de asistencia en línea:

  • Skagit Legal Aid – Sirviendo a los residentes del condado de Skagit y a los hogares que enfrentan el desalojo por razones distintas a la renta atrasada
  • Community to Community Development (C2C) – Sirviendo a miembros de la comunidad de trabajadores agrícolas y Latinx
  • Padres a Padres – Sirviendo a familias donde una o más personas tienen una discapacidad del desarrollo y / o necesidades de atención médica complejas

Para obtener más información sobre el Programa de Asistencia de Alquiler, verificar la elegibilidad o solicitar asistencia, visite www.skagitcounty.net/renthelp o llame al (360) 416-1500.


What does the new Housing Stability ‘Bridge’ Emergency Order mean for Skagitonians?

Reading Time: 2 minutes

On June 29, 2021 Gov. Jay Inslee issued a housing stability ‘bridge’ emergency order, Proclamation 21-09, intended to ‘bridge’ the gap between the eviction moratorium and the new protections and programs enacted by the State Legislature. 

What does this means for renters and landlords?

Until there is an operational Eviction Resolution Program in Skagit County, eviction for non-payment of past due rent is not permitted. However, by August 1st, tenants must either begin paying full rent, negotiate a plan with their landlord to catch up on past due rent or apply for funds with a local rental assistance program. Public Health strongly encourages tenants to stay in their homes and housing providers not to proceed with evictions for tenants who owe rent. Tenants who leave will not be eligible for rental assistance and may have difficulty finding a new home. Landlords who evict tenants cannot then collect assistance for the back rent owed by that tenant.

What is the Eviction Resolution Program and when will it be available in Skagit County?

The Eviction Resolution Program engages both landlords, tenants, and their legal counsel to resolve any issues including but not limited to back rent issues that may cause an eviction once the moratorium has expired.

The goal of the program is to ensure landlords and tenants are connected to rent assistance, legal counsel and have an opportunity at mediation or meet and confer to resolve the housing conflicts prior to filing an unlawful detainer which may result in an eviction.

In Skagit County, there is not currently an operational Eviction Resolution Program and we will provide updates as more information becomes available.  In the interim, landlords and tenants are encouraged to reach out to and work with their local dispute resolution center (DRC) 425-789-7500 (intake) and skagitdrc@voaww.org.

Where can Skagitonians go for assistance if behind on rent?

The Skagit County Rental Assistance Program is currently active and accepting applications for assistance. Funding is available for renters or landlords who have lost income due to COVID-19 and are struggling to pay or collect rent. The program can cover rent up to 150% of Fair market value for past due rent incurred after March 13, 2020, as well as future rent. These funds can also assist with past-due utilities and other housing costs directly or indirectly due to COVID-19.

A list of local rental assistance provider is available here: English | Spanish

Renters and landlords who do not qualify for assistance will be referred to the Volunteers of America Landlord-Tenant Program. ltinfo@voaww.org 425-339-1335 ext. 4.

What should landlords do if they have tenants that are behind on rent?

Property owners can reach out to a rental assistance provider on behalf of their tenants.  A list of local rental assistance providers is available here: English | Spanish

Additional Resources:


Skagit County COVID-19 Mortgage Relief Grant Program

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Have you missed your mortgage payment because your income has been negatively impacted by COVID-19? You may be eligible for assistance.

Funding is available to help homeowners who have fallen behind on their mortgage payments because their income has fallen due to COVID-19. This one-time grant is for eligible Skagit County residents to pay up $6,000 of past-due or currently due mortgage payments per household as a result of a temporary job loss, reduction in work hours or other income hardship caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Applications are available online and will be accepted until November 23, or until all funds have been spent. Completed applications can be mailed or hand-delivered from 9am-4pm to Skagit County Public Health, 700 S 2nd Street, Mount Vernon, WA 98273.

Eligible Uses of Funds

Direct payments will be made to the mortgage company on the applicant’s behalf. No payments will be made directly to the applicant. Payments may be used for mortgage principal, interest and Private Mortgage Insurance, but not for escrowed items like property taxes or hazard insurance.

How do I know if my income qualifies?

To qualify, your household’s current adjusted gross income (AGI) has to be at or below 50 percent of the Area Median Income.  See the table below.

What if my household income is currently over the limit?

Unfortunately, you are ineligible for this assistance if your household income is above the maximum amount. If you can’t pay your mortgage, or can only pay a portion, you should contact your mortgage company immediately.  You should also know that if you have a federally insured or backed mortgage, there is currently a foreclosure moratorium that runs through December 31, 2020. Homeownership counseling and assistance is available to all Washington residents, and you can call the Washington Department of Financial Institutions toll-free number 1-877-RING-DFI (746-4334) for assistance. 

Contact for Skagit Mortgage Assistance Program Questions:

Skagit County Public Health
(360) 416-1500
housing@co.skagit.wa.us